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  • Filmmaker Gotham Chopra is primarily known for sports documentaries such as "Shut Up and Dribble" and "David Ortiz: The Last Walk Off," so, it might seem surprising that his latest docuseries should be about Bon Jovi. The filmmaker has said that Jon Bon Jovi, a big-time sports fan, had seen Chopra's series about Tom Brady

  • Writer-director Shane Atkinson's "LaRoy, Texas" is a deliciously nasty film in the style of early-John Dahl (especially his "Red Rock West"), with the grim humor of the Coen Brothers thrown in. This is the kind of southern pulp noir that grabs its audience by the hair and forces them down in the muck.

    John Magaro is Ray is the definition of a pushover and a classic noir schlub; his older brother, Junior (Matthew Del Negro), treats him like his inferior even though the two supposedly own equal shares in the hardware business they inherited from their parents. Ray also learns that his wife, Stacy-Lynn (Megan Stevenson), is having an affair.

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    (BY SAÏDEH PAKRAVAN) Anyone who has seen Fight Club and American History X knows that you don’t want to mess with Edward Norton. In the Incredible Hulk, any number of people forget that lesson and make him very angry indeed. The result is not good. For over two long hours, bodies, helicopters, army tanks, chemistry labs and assorted debris go flying through the air with the appropriate deafening sounds. Monsters tackle each other, really mean-looking weapons burst into endless rat-a-tat-tats, a well-meaning general with the absurd logic of generals everywhere finally comes to his senses and realizes that maybe, just maybe, creating more efficient killing machines has its downside. The Incredible Hulk, predictable and loud as it is, comes to us heralded by at least one or two good reviews so we might want to sit back and enjoy. The movie does not pretend to be any more than the story of a comic strip hero come to animated life. Sure, the pixel guys have gone amok and the large figures of the hero and the villain strain the imagination. Dr. Bruce Banner’s alter ego the Hulk and Blonsky (Tim Roth)’s Abomination are truly enormous. So, distractingly, are Liv Tyler‘s collagened lips. The movie is full of references: the two monsters running toward each other to finally collide in an epic fight including lots of grunting for an audience of awe-struck New Yorkers (who seem to spend an awful amount of time watching monsters and natural disasters wreak havoc on their streets) are reenacting a High Noon-style confrontation for the 21st century, the parkour race in the favelas of Rio is reminiscent of the chase at the beginning of the recent James Bond movie with Daniel Craig, hell, the Abomination’s voice is that of Lou Ferrigno (for those who don’t remember the name, Ferrigno was the original unjolly green giant, long long before the present supersized ones in the Hulk movies that Hollywood keeps churning out). Still reason enough to see this movie, Edward Norton, of course, he of the golden game, he who can convey so much while doing so little. The Incredible Hulk is entirely forgettable but Norton, as always, makes you wonder whether acting can get any better (THE INCREDIBLE HULK is out in theatres now)

    (BY SAÏDEH PAKRAVAN) Anyone who has seen Fight Club and American History X knows that you don’t want to mess with Edward Norton. In the Incredible Hulk, any number of people forget that lesson and make him very angry indeed. The result is not good. For over two long hours, bodies, helicopters, army tanks, chemistry labs and assorted debris go flying through the air with the appropriate deafening sounds. Monsters tackle each other, really mean-looking weapons burst into endless rat-a-tat-tats, a well-meaning general with the absurd logic of generals everywhere finally comes to his senses and realizes that maybe, just maybe, creating more efficient killing machines has its downside. The Incredible Hulk, predictable and loud as it is, comes to us heralded by at least one or two good reviews so we might want to sit back and enjoy. The movie does not pretend to be any more than the story of a comic strip hero come to animated life. Sure, the pixel guys have gone amok and the large figures of the hero and the villain strain the imagination. Dr. Bruce Banner’s alter ego the Hulk and Blonsky (Tim Roth)’s Abomination are truly enormous. So, distractingly, are Liv Tyler‘s collagened lips. The movie is full of references: the two monsters running toward each other to finally collide in an epic fight including lots of grunting for an audience of awe-struck New Yorkers (who seem to spend an awful amount of time watching monsters and natural disasters wreak havoc on their streets) are reenacting a High Noon-style confrontation for the 21st century, the parkour race in the favelas of Rio is reminiscent of the chase at the beginning of the recent James Bond movie with Daniel Craig, hell, the Abomination’s voice is that of Lou Ferrigno (for those who don’t remember the name, Ferrigno was the original unjolly green giant, long long before the present supersized ones in the Hulk movies that Hollywood keeps churning out). Still reason enough to see this movie, Edward Norton, of course, he of the golden game, he who can convey so much while doing so little. The Incredible Hulk is entirely forgettable but Norton, as always, makes you wonder whether acting can get any better (THE INCREDIBLE HULK is out in theatres now)

    (BY SAÏDEH PAKRAVAN) Anyone who has seen Fight Club and American History X knows that you don’t want to mess with Edward Norton. In the Incredible Hulk, any number of people forget that lesson and make him very angry indeed. The result is not good. For over two long hours, bodies, helicopters, army tanks, chemistry labs and assorted debris go flying through the air with the appropriate deafening sounds. Monsters tackle each other, really mean-looking weapons burst into endless rat-a-tat-tats, a well-meaning general with the absurd logic of generals everywhere finally comes to his senses and realizes that maybe, just maybe, creating more efficient killing machines has its downside. The Incredible Hulk, predictable and loud as it is, comes to us heralded by at least one or two good reviews so we might want to sit back and enjoy. The movie does not pretend to be any more than the story of a comic strip hero come to animated life. Sure, the pixel guys have gone amok and the large figures of the hero and the villain strain the imagination. Dr. Bruce Banner’s alter ego the Hulk and Blonsky (Tim Roth)’s Abomination are truly enormous. So, distractingly, are Liv Tyler‘s collagened lips. The movie is full of references: the two monsters running toward each other to finally collide in an epic fight including lots of grunting for an audience of awe-struck New Yorkers (who seem to spend an awful amount of time watching monsters and natural disasters wreak havoc on their streets) are reenacting a High Noon-style confrontation for the 21st century, the parkour race in the favelas of Rio is reminiscent of the chase at the beginning of the recent James Bond movie with Daniel Craig, hell, the Abomination’s voice is that of Lou Ferrigno (for those who don’t remember the name, Ferrigno was the original unjolly green giant, long long before the present supersized ones in the Hulk movies that Hollywood keeps churning out). Still reason enough to see this movie, Edward Norton, of course, he of the golden game, he who can convey so much while doing so little. The Incredible Hulk is entirely forgettable but Norton, as always, makes you wonder whether acting can get any better (THE INCREDIBLE HULK is out in theatres now)

    The real reason—perhaps the only reason—to watch Righteous Kill is the rare match-up of screen giants Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino.

    While they are forever linked to one another in acting style, cinematic era and New York attitude, they actually have only appeared in the same film twice (The Godfather, Part II and Heat) and have only shared screen time in Michael Mann’s bank heist epic. Unless someone films The Godfather: The Golden Years or Bucket List: New York, any time they get together could be the last time.

    So it’s pleasing to see that in this Jon Avnet crime thriller, we have two old horses out to do honor to their reputations. The actor’s craft in Righteous Kill somewhat neutralizes its spastic editing, logical leaps and crooked storytelling.

    The legends play longtime police detective partners on the trail of a serial killer who leaves lousy poetry at the crime scenes. The pair comes from that Hollywood version of New York where every police detective is hardball and streetwise. Slap the cuffs, read the rights, and kick the stomach. Soon police suspect the killings are being perpetrated by a policeman. Suspicion falls on one of the partners. But is he really the guy?

    While no one will mistake Righteous Kill for their best work, it’s still nice to see the two actors in good form, as they haven’t exactly been throwing down aces lately. Pacino, in particular seems more comfortable here than he has in a long time – looser, funnier, more generous, and freed of the burden of delivering “Al Pacino” that has pestered recent performances. DeNiro dusts off the intensity that so long has been associated with his work.

    What the performances bring to the table, the dull-headed mystery brings down. It can’t decide whether it’s a whodunit or a how’d-they-do-it. As the answer gets more and more obvious, the film takes more and more time to get there. A film that begins with frantic editing creeps to an end with scenes that linger. And linger. And linger.

    Some of the film’s silly improbabilities are really a riot. Have two senior citizens ever had more active sex lives? How do you hit a skateboarder with a clean shot right between the eyes? How could a cop kill 14 people related to his cases without getting nabbed around, say, five? Others are not as funny. Does every woman need to be a victim? Does every black man need to be a criminal?

    Righteous Kill is a bit like a visit to older family members. A little bland and old-fashioned, but good to see that the folks can still get around.

    The real reason—perhaps the only reason—to watch Righteous Kill is the rare match-up of screen giants Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino.

    While they are forever linked to one another in acting style, cinematic era and New York attitude, they actually have only appeared in the same film twice (The Godfather, Part II and Heat) and have only shared screen time in Michael Mann’s bank heist epic. Unless someone films The Godfather: The Golden Years or Bucket List: New York, any time they get together could be the last time.

    So it’s pleasing to see that in this Jon Avnet crime thriller, we have two old horses out to do honor to their reputations. The actor’s craft in Righteous Kill somewhat neutralizes its spastic editing, logical leaps and crooked storytelling.

    The legends play longtime police detective partners on the trail of a serial killer who leaves lousy poetry at the crime scenes. The pair comes from that Hollywood version of New York where every police detective is hardball and streetwise. Slap the cuffs, read the rights, and kick the stomach. Soon police suspect the killings are being perpetrated by a policeman. Suspicion falls on one of the partners. But is he really the guy?

    While no one will mistake Righteous Kill for their best work, it’s still nice to see the two actors in good form, as they haven’t exactly been throwing down aces lately. Pacino, in particular seems more comfortable here than he has in a long time – looser, funnier, more generous, and freed of the burden of delivering “Al Pacino” that has pestered recent performances. DeNiro dusts off the intensity that so long has been associated with his work.

    What the performances bring to the table, the dull-headed mystery brings down. It can’t decide whether it’s a whodunit or a how’d-they-do-it. As the answer gets more and more obvious, the film takes more and more time to get there. A film that begins with frantic editing creeps to an end with scenes that linger. And linger. And linger.

    Some of the film’s silly improbabilities are really a riot. Have two senior citizens ever had more active sex lives? How do you hit a skateboarder with a clean shot right between the eyes? How could a cop kill 14 people related to his cases without getting nabbed around, say, five? Others are not as funny. Does every woman need to be a victim? Does every black man need to be a criminal?

    Righteous Kill is a bit like a visit to older family members. A little bland and old-fashioned, but good to see that the folks can still get around.

    The real reason—perhaps the only reason—to watch Righteous Kill is the rare match-up of screen giants Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino.

    While they are forever linked to one another in acting style, cinematic era and New York attitude, they actually have only appeared in the same film twice (The Godfather, Part II and Heat) and have only shared screen time in Michael Mann’s bank heist epic. Unless someone films The Godfather: The Golden Years or Bucket List: New York, any time they get together could be the last time.

    So it’s pleasing to see that in this Jon Avnet crime thriller, we have two old horses out to do honor to their reputations. The actor’s craft in Righteous Kill somewhat neutralizes its spastic editing, logical leaps and crooked storytelling.

    The legends play longtime police detective partners on the trail of a serial killer who leaves lousy poetry at the crime scenes. The pair comes from that Hollywood version of New York where every police detective is hardball and streetwise. Slap the cuffs, read the rights, and kick the stomach. Soon police suspect the killings are being perpetrated by a policeman. Suspicion falls on one of the partners. But is he really the guy?

    While no one will mistake Righteous Kill for their best work, it’s still nice to see the two actors in good form, as they haven’t exactly been throwing down aces lately. Pacino, in particular seems more comfortable here than he has in a long time – looser, funnier, more generous, and freed of the burden of delivering “Al Pacino” that has pestered recent performances. DeNiro dusts off the intensity that so long has been associated with his work.

    What the performances bring to the table, the dull-headed mystery brings down. It can’t decide whether it’s a whodunit or a how’d-they-do-it. As the answer gets more and more obvious, the film takes more and more time to get there. A film that begins with frantic editing creeps to an end with scenes that linger. And linger. And linger.

    Some of the film’s silly improbabilities are really a riot. Have two senior citizens ever had more active sex lives? How do you hit a skateboarder with a clean shot right between the eyes? How could a cop kill 14 people related to his cases without getting nabbed around, say, five? Others are not as funny. Does every woman need to be a victim? Does every black man need to be a criminal?

    Righteous Kill is a bit like a visit to older family members. A little bland and old-fashioned, but good to see that the folks can still get around.

    The real reason—perhaps the only reason—to watch Righteous Kill is the rare match-up of screen giants Robert DeNiro and Al Pacino.

    While they are forever linked to one another in acting style, cinematic era and New York attitude, they actually have only appeared in the same film twice (The Godfather, Part II and Heat) and have only shared screen time in Michael Mann’s bank heist epic. Unless someone films The Godfather: The Golden Years or Bucket List: New York, any time they get together could be the last time.

    So it’s pleasing to see that in this Jon Avnet crime thriller, we have two old horses out to do honor to their reputations. The actor’s craft in Righteous Kill somewhat neutralizes its spastic editing, logical leaps and crooked storytelling.

    The legends play longtime police detective partners on the trail of a serial killer who leaves lousy poetry at the crime scenes. The pair comes from that Hollywood version of New York where every police detective is hardball and streetwise. Slap the cuffs, read the rights, and kick the stomach. Soon police suspect the killings are being perpetrated by a policeman. Suspicion falls on one of the partners. But is he really the guy?

    While no one will mistake Righteous Kill for their best work, it’s still nice to see the two actors in good form, as they haven’t exactly been throwing down aces lately. Pacino, in particular seems more comfortable here than he has in a long time – looser, funnier, more generous, and freed of the burden of delivering “Al Pacino” that has pestered recent performances. DeNiro dusts off the intensity that so long has been associated with his work.

    What the performances bring to the table, the dull-headed mystery brings down. It can’t decide whether it’s a whodunit or a how’d-they-do-it. As the answer gets more and more obvious, the film takes more and more time to get there. A film that begins with frantic editing creeps to an end with scenes that linger. And linger. And linger.

    Some of the film’s silly improbabilities are really a riot. Have two senior citizens ever had more active sex lives? How do you hit a skateboarder with a clean shot right between the eyes? How could a cop kill 14 people related to his cases without getting nabbed around, say, five? Others are not as funny. Does every woman need to be a victim? Does every black man need to be a criminal?

    Righteous Kill is a bit like a visit to older family members. A little bland and old-fashioned, but good to see that the folks can still get around.