INTERVIEWS

In conversation with the creator and cast of “LOSING ALICE,” airing today on Apple TV +

An erotic neo-noir with a Faustian bargain thrown in

The Apple TV+ series “Losing Alice” fashions an atmosphere of dread in its first moments and never lets up. Over eight episodes this Israeli import, which debuts stateside on Friday, is more about engendering a feeling within the viewer rather than setting up a who-did-what-when thriller procedural. Not that the staples of the mystery genre aren’t present. But unlike lesser shows, which start ... more >

“We saw scores, then hundreds, change”; interview with the director of “Gay Chorus Deep South”

Film premieres today

Donald Trump’s 2016 election shocked a great many, including Dr. Tim Seelig, the artistic director of the San Francisco Gay Men’s Chorus. Despite the heartbreaking result, Seelig decided that, rather than continue to perform for friendly Bay Area audiences, it was time to head south—-to the Deep South. After Trump’s election, Seelig and the choir announced their intention to stage a tour to ... more >

“I didn’t hire Christopher Walken for his accent; I hired him for his soul” (talking with playwright and writer/director John Patrick Shanley about his latest film “Wild Mountain Thyme”)

Shanley is best-known for the 2008 film "Doubt"

Since international travel is currently all but impossible the movies provide a way to visit other parts of the world—as they always have. And it was of tremendous importance to writer/director John Patrick Shanley (“Doubt,” “Moonstruck”) that Ireland, the land of his forefathers, be a main character in his new film “Wild Mountain Thyme,” adapted from his play “Outside Mullingar.” “Instead of ... more >

INTERVIEW: “Ultimately, it’s the deepest quest of all,” Errol Morris speaks with us about his new film “My psychedelic love story,” it airs tonight

Fourth Floor Productions; Moxie Pictures

Even as we spoke on the phone last week, filmmaker Errol Morris said he was still putting the finishing touches on his new documentary, a version of which I had seen not long before the Oscar-winning director of “The Fog of War” and “Gates of Heaven” chatted with me from his home in Massachusetts. Until recently, he was still color correcting and filling in the musical score. Letting go of the ... more >

Coherent and intense horror indie “Fishbowl” started streaming on Tuesday. We got a sit-down with the brother-sister team who directed it and this is what they said

"I like a slow burn, where you take [something] realistic and maybe exaggerate it a little bit" (S. Kinigopoulos)

Stephen and Alexa Kinigopoulos wanted to make a movie where they came from. The siblings, who co-directed the new psychological thriller “Fishbowl,” grew up near Baltimore, and so when they were seeking a setting for their film, they simply cast their gaze out the window. “When you’re surrounded by those locations every day, you maybe see them differently. And it’s always great to shoot in ... more >

“Jamal [Khashoggi] was one of our own”; interview with KINGDOM OF SILENCE director Rick Rowley

Film was co-executive produced by Alex Gibney ("Taxi to the dark side")
Jigsaw Productions; Showtime Documentary Films
Directed by Rick Rowley

It has been two years since Jamal Khashoggi walked into the Saudi consulate in Istanbul and was never seen again. The royal family at first claimed Khashoggi had left the consulate on his own, but then changed their story to say a fight had broken out. But the full truth, later confirmed by the CIA, was far worse: He was murdered inside the consulate by a hit squad sent by the frequent target of ... more >

“There were literally firearms everywhere. They had no fear of us and we had no fear of them,” our talk with NICK QUESTED, director of “Blood on the Wall,” which premieres this week

A National Geographic documentary

Nick Quested believes the War on Drugs cannot be properly understood without examining the social, economic and political situation of our neighbors to the south. The documentarian says that Americans all too often view the import of drugs as Mexico’s problem rather than one of interconnectedness between our two nations. “What Americans should understand is that this is a problem of economics, ... more >