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“CARE,” a poignant tribute to the workers of home-based care

A growing number of elderly prefer to while away the days at home
Directed by Deirdre Fishel
Produced by Tony Heriza

A man stricken with Parkinson's disease tries to shift from a chair to his wheelchair; even with his wife and stay-in caretaker assisting, he falls, his eyes filled with terror. A man with emphysema, who can only use one his lungs, wheezes, in a high-pitched croak, that he desperately needs one of his many anxiety meds. A ninety-two year-old woman with dementia—whose Costa Rican caretaker found ... more >

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INTERVIEW | Talking with Derrick Borte of “London Town”

He tells us about guerilla filmmaking and the art of The Clash
Jonathan Rhys Meyers and Daniel Huttlestone
Directed by Derrick Borte

Joe Strummer was a mensch. That's one thing the makers of "London Town," which opened Friday in New York and Los Angeles, want you to know about the late frontman of The Clash. Set in 1979 in working-class London, the film, directed by Derrick Borte ("The Joneses") and written by Matt Brown, Sonya Gildea and Kirsten Sheridan ("In America"), is a coming-of-age story laced with the political ... more >

At TFF2015, two films about disease, afflicting the filmmakers themselves

Both films were screened at this year's Tribeca Festival

Both PRESCRIPTION THUGS AND TRANSFATTY LIVES are about crippling diseases—one voluntary, one not—and both are intensely personal, given how these afflictions affect both directors themselves. TRANSFATTY LIVES, the slightly better of the two films, played on Wednesday, while PRESCRIPTION THUGS was shown on Thursday and will play again Saturday at 6:30 PM at Chelsea's Bow Tie Cinemas. Chris ... more >

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TALKING MOVIES | THE ROAD WITHIN, gentle comedy about affliction

[2014]
Zoë Kravitz, Robert Sheehan and Dev Patel
Directed by Gren Wells

On Friday Gren Wells's "The Road Within," a low-key dramedy about affliction adapted from the 2010 German film "Vincent Goes to Sea," opened in New York and Los Angeles. It stars the young, promising Irish actor Robert Sheehan as a teenager stricken with Tourette's, whose cold-hearted father (Robert Patrick of "Terminator 2": Judgment Day") installs him in a mental clinic after his mother dies. ... more >

The (sort of) truth behind the two versions of Abel Ferrara’s “Welcome to New York”

Includes conversations with Abel Ferrara and Vincent Maraval [Wild Bunch]
Film will come out in one theater only in San Francisco

Today, after a six month-press war launched by filmmaker Abel Ferrara against his chief financier, Vincent Maraval (French distributor Wild Bunch's head honcho) and IFC Films, the R-rated cut of Ferrara’s originally unrated “Welcome to New York” is opening theatrically—to Ferrara’s chagrin—in the US. It is, however, only showing at one theater: The Roxie, in San Francisco. Elsewhere in this ... more >

THE RIOT CLUB

Where your reputation can be made or broken in one night
Max Irons, Douglas Booth and Sam Claflin
Directed by Lone Scherfig

The slyest aspect about Lone Scherfig’s “The Riot Club” is also its most maddening one. Structurally, the whole production is a come-on, a tease, a manipulative stunt. It begins in lusciously ribald fashion as we are treated to nineteenth-century sexual shenanigans amid the upper classes at Oxford University: white wigs, splashy capes and all. A beloved hedonist is murdered after cuckolding an ... more >

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INTERVIEW | Sally Kirkland, “Archaeology of a woman”

"In Europe, the elders are revered"
An arresting look at the horrors of dementia
Directed by Sharon Greytak

Sharon Greytak’s “Archaeology of a Woman,” now playing in New York, is a scintillating, intimate look at the horrors of dementia crossed with a purposefully disorienting murder mystery. Margaret (Sally Kirkland in riveting form) is a septuagenarian prone to automotive scrapes and violent temper tantrums. Her fortysomething daughter Kate (an equally fine Victoria Clark) is understandably worried ... more >